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Miscellaneous Tech


Windows NT4, HTML Symbols, Metrix 51EX etc.

A collection of arcane technical topics in computing and printing



Windows NT4

Windows NT4 is the best operating system Microsoft ever released. The only serious drawback was the lack of USB support, but Inside Out Networks produced add-ons for this, distributed by Dell. The loading sequence is:

  1. Raw NT from NT CD
  2. Set startup delay, default locale in regional settings
  3. SP6i386.exe SP6a
  4. Q299444i.exe Hotfix
  5. i4usb406.exe for USB
  6. Video driver, Twain etc.

NT will only install onto a partition of 2Gb or less, though if desired this partition can be enlarged later by various means. The remainder of the drive can be defined as a second partition, e.g. used for storing restorable clones of the system partition (the clean NT install, saved with Clonezilla or a similar utility), plus backups of the data drive(s). The NT partition can be either FAT-format or NTFS.

Hotfix Q299444i.exe is a “security patch” and probably unnecessary for a secure machine that is not connected to a network.

SP6a will report as “Build 1381: Service Pack 6.” There was apparently a minor patch done to SP6 only a couple of days after it was released.

There are several versions of the USB utility add-ons. A self-extracting ZIP file intea01i.exe contains R69735, and R62200.exe is a slightly older version of that. The file i4usb406.exe installs directly and gives USB 2.0 transfer speed (copying 34Mb to a thumb drive takes 66s with R69735, 33s with i4usb406). There are sometimes error messages with thumb drives, they all seem to behave differently. Actually the ones that show errors work the best! (e.g. the device being removed from the drive list immediately on ejection). When installing the Inside Out Networks USB driver, it is normally only necessary to select items 1, 3 and 5 in the drivers checkbox list.

NT screen shortly after install with Disk Administrator showing two partitions on drive C:

With modern Intel CPU’s NT4 Setup can crash. This occurs as the CD-ROM filesystem is being copied from the CD, and after the “Blue screen of death” Setup will start again, in a never-ending loop. A CPUID call is involved. Reportedly, many motherboards have an option ‘Limit CPUID Max to 3’ and a Gigabyte motherboard provides this helpful explanation:

Limit CPUID Maximum value to 3 when using older OS like NT4

When a motherboard does not offer this option, an interesting challenge would be to insert code to limit the returned CPUID value. The interrupt would need to be re-mapped after execution of the Bios but before booting from the Setup CD, perhaps via the bootstrap.

Very likely, the CPUID check in NT Setup is redundant. It’s a pity that Microsoft never (apparently) released a version of NT4 with SP6 already installed.

Probably a simpler fix to this problem would be to make an assembly code patch in the relevant Setup executable. This will involve using

winnt32.exe /b
to copy the setup files to HD. However, a search through all the files for the expected op-codes yields either too many or zero hits. The CPUID function is initially called as follows:

MOV EAX,00000000
CPUID

Searching for 0F A2h (CPUID) gives over 900 hits while a search for 66 B8 00 00 00 00 0F A2h gives 0 (as best as can be determined being rusty and without a good set of development utilities). The easiest solution to this problem here is to continue using an old Gigabyte motherboard with a backup AMD system.




How HTML Codes Display on your Browser: Symbols Beyond ASCII

The most reliable way of displaying non-standard characters on web pages is by specifying them in numeric form. For example, − gives the minus sign. The red ones in the table below are deprecated, the green ones are those most essential for proper typography in screen text.



Decimal codes for HTML entities


 
32: space
33-39:
! " # $ % & '
40-49:
( ) * + , - . / 0 1
50-59:
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 : ;
60-69:
< = > ? @ A B C D E
70-79:
F G H I J K L M N O
80-89:
P Q R S T U V W X Y
90-99:
Z [ \ ] ^ _ ` a b c
100-109:
d e f g h i j k l m
110-119:
n o p q r s t u v w
120-129:
x y z { | } ~  € 
130-139:
‚ ƒ „ … † ‡ ˆ ‰ Š ‹
140-149:
Œ  Ž   ‘ ’ “ ” •
150-159:
– — ˜ ™ š › œ  ž Ÿ

160-169:
  ¡ ¢ £ ¤ ¥ ¦ § ¨ ©
170-179:
ª « ¬ ­ ® ¯ ° ± ² ³
180-189:
´ µ ¶ · ¸ ¹ º » ¼ ½
190-199:
¾ ¿ À Á Â Ã Ä Å Æ Ç
200-209:
È É Ê Ë Ì Í Î Ï Ð Ñ
210-219:
Ò Ó Ô Õ Ö × Ø Ù Ú Û
220-229:
Ü Ý Þ ß à á â ã ä å
230-239:
æ ç è é ê ë ì í î ï
240-249:
ð ñ ò ó ô õ ö ÷ ø ù
250-259:
ú û ü ý þ ÿ Ā ā Ă ă
260-269:
Ą ą Ć ć Ĉ ĉ Ċ ċ Č č
270-279:
Ď ď Đ đ Ē ē Ĕ ĕ Ė ė
280-289:
Ę ę Ě ě Ĝ ĝ Ğ ğ Ġ ġ
290-299:
Ģ ģ Ĥ ĥ Ħ ħ Ĩ ĩ Ī ī
300-309:
Ĭ ĭ Į į İ ı IJ ij Ĵ ĵ
310-319:
Ķ ķ ĸ Ĺ ĺ Ļ ļ Ľ ľ Ŀ
320-329:
ŀ Ł ł Ń ń Ņ ņ Ň ň ʼn
330-339:
Ŋ ŋ Ō ō Ŏ ŏ Ő ő Œ œ
340-349:
Ŕ ŕ Ŗ ŗ Ř ř Ś ś Ŝ ŝ
350-359:
Ş ş Š š Ţ ţ Ť ť Ŧ ŧ
360-369:
Ũ ũ Ū ū Ŭ ŭ Ů ů Ű ű
370-379:
Ų ų Ŵ ŵ Ŷ ŷ Ÿ Ź ź Ż
380-389:
ż Ž ž ſ ƀ Ɓ Ƃ ƃ Ƅ ƅ
390-399:
Ɔ Ƈ ƈ Ɖ Ɗ Ƌ ƌ ƍ Ǝ Ə
400-409:
Ɛ Ƒ ƒ Ɠ Ɣ ƕ Ɩ Ɨ Ƙ ƙ




900-909:
΄ ΅ Ά · Έ Ή Ί ΋ Ό ΍
910-919:
Ύ Ώ ΐ Α Β Γ Δ Ε Ζ Η
920-929:
Θ Ι Κ Λ Μ Ν Ξ Ο Π Ρ
930-939:
΢ Σ Τ Υ Φ Χ Ψ Ω Ϊ Ϋ
940-949:
ά έ ή ί ΰ α β γ δ ε
950-959:
ζ η θ ι κ λ μ ν ξ ο
960-969:
π ρ ς σ τ υ φ χ ψ ω
970-979:
ϊ ϋ ό ύ ώ Ϗ ϐ ϑ ϒ ϓ
980-989:
ϔ ϕ ϖ ϗ Ϙ ϙ Ϛ ϛ Ϝ ϝ
990-999:
Ϟ ϟ Ϡ ϡ Ϣ ϣ Ϥ ϥ Ϧ ϧ

A more complete list is here.
             8194: en space
8195: em space
8201: thin space
8202: hair space
8210-8219:
– — ― ‖ ‗ ‘ ’ ‚ ‛
8220-8229:
“ ” „
‟ † ‡ • ‣ ․ ‥
8230:

8240-8249:
‰ ‱ ′ ″ ‴ ‵ ‶ ‷ ‸ ‹
8250-8259:
› ※ ‼ ‽ ‾ ‿ ⁀ ⁁ ⁂ ⁃
8260:

8364-8465:
€ ℑ
8472:

8476:

8482:

8484:

8486:
(ohms)
8501:

8530-8539:
⅒ ⅓ ⅔ ⅕ ⅖ ⅗ ⅘ ⅙ ⅚ ⅛
8540-8542:
⅜ ⅝ ⅞
8590-8599:
↎ ↏ ← ↑ → ↓ ↔ ↕ ↖ ↗
8629:

8650-8659:
⇊ ⇋ ⇌ ⇍ ⇎ ⇏ ⇐ ⇑ ⇒ ⇓
8660-8669:
⇔ ⇕ ⇖ ⇗ ⇘ ⇙ ⇚ ⇛ ⇜ ⇝
8670-8679:
⇞ ⇟ ⇠ ⇡ ⇢ ⇣ ⇤ ⇥ ⇦ ⇧
8680-8682:
⇨ ⇩ ⇪
8710-8719:
∆ ∇ ∈ ∉ ∊ ∋ ∌ ∍ ∎ ∏
8720-8729:
∐ ∑ − ∓ ∔ ∕ ∖ ∗ ∘ ∙
8730-8739:
√ ∛ ∜ ∝ ∞ ∟ ∠ ∡ ∢ ∣
8740-8749:
∤ ∥ ∦ ∧ ∨ ∩ ∪ ∫ ∬ ∭
8750-8759:
∮ ∯ ∰ ∱ ∲ ∳ ∴ ∵ ∶ ∷
8760-8769:
∸ ∹ ∺ ∻ ∼ ∽ ∾ ∿ ≀ ≁
8770-8779:
≂ ≃ ≄ ≅ ≆ ≇ ≈ ≉ ≊ ≋
8780-8789:
≌ ≍ ≎ ≏ ≐ ≑ ≒ ≓ ≔ ≕
8790-8799:
≖ ≗ ≘ ≙ ≚ ≛ ≜ ≝ ≞ ≟
8800-8809:
≠ ≡ ≢ ≣ ≤ ≥ ≦ ≧ ≨ ≩
8810-8819:
≪ ≫ ≬ ≭ ≮ ≯ ≰ ≱ ≲ ≳
8820-8829:
≴ ≵ ≶ ≷ ≸ ≹ ≺ ≻ ≼ ≽
8830-8839:
≾ ≿ ⊀ ⊁ ⊂ ⊃ ⊄ ⊅ ⊆ ⊇
8840-8849:
⊈ ⊉ ⊊ ⊋ ⊌ ⊍ ⊎ ⊏ ⊐ ⊑
8850-8859:
⊒ ⊓ ⊔ ⊕ ⊖ ⊗ ⊘ ⊙ ⊚ ⊛
8860-8869:
⊜ ⊝ ⊞ ⊟ ⊠ ⊡ ⊢ ⊣ ⊤ ⊥
8870-8879:
⊦ ⊧ ⊨ ⊩ ⊪ ⊫ ⊬ ⊭ ⊮ ⊯
8880-8889:
⊰ ⊱ ⊲ ⊳ ⊴ ⊵ ⊶ ⊷ ⊸ ⊹
8900-8909:
⋄ ⋅ ⋆ ⋇ ⋈ ⋉ ⋊ ⋋ ⋌ ⋍
8968-8971:
⌈ ⌉ ⌊ ⌋
9674:

9792:

9794:

9824:

9827:

9829-9830:
♥ ♦
9834:

9837-9839:
♭ ♮ ♯





Quark Keyboard Shortcuts

Based on Quark 5, but will likely work for all versions


 
Viewing Mac Windows
100% Command+1 Ctrl+1
Fit in windows Command+0 Ctrl+0
200% Option+Command+click Ctrl+Alt+click
Zoom in Command+click Ctrl+spacebar+click
Zoom out Option+Command+click Ctrl+Alt+spacebar+click
Thumbnails Shift+F6 Shift+F6
Change view percentage Control+V Ctrl+Alt+V
Force redraw Option+Command+period Shift+Esc
Halt redraw Command+period Esc
Go to page Command+J Ctrl+J
Windows submenu Shift+click title bar Alt+W (tile, stack)
Show/hide invisibles Command+I Ctrl+I
Show/hide rulers Command+R Ctrl+R
Show/hide guides F7 F7
Show/hide baseline grid Option+F7 Ctrl+F7
 
Object Selection Mac Windows
Snap to guides Shift+F7 Shift+F7
Select all Command+A Ctrl+A
Select item behind Option+Shift+Command+click Ctrl+Alt+Shift+click another
Multiple series Shift+click Shift+click
Multiple separates Command+click Ctrl+click
 
Palettes, properties Mac Windows
Show/hide Measurements F9 F9
Show/hide Tools F8 F8
Show/hide Document Layout F10 F4
Show/hide StyleSheets F11 F11
Show/hide Colors F12 F12
Show/hide Trap Information Option+F12 Ctrl+F12
Show/hide Lists Option+F11 Ctrl+F11
Show/hide Index Option+Command+I Ctrl+Alt+I
Show font use F13
Show picture use Option+F13








Metrix 51EX

The MX51EX is a quality, French-made digital multimeter rated for hazardous environments such as gas plants and oil refineries. Metrix kindly provided the scanned pages of the manual as a PDF file but unfortunately the file was corrupt. It took some doing, but here is the fixed version.

Scanned (fixed) MX51EX Manual (English pages)

If the blanking plug is removed from the right-most socket, up to 10A can be measured, only the decimal point is in the wrong place. The fuse and circuitry remain from a similar model.




Fuser Grease

A truly arcane topic is the grease used in laser printers. At the fuser, the sleeve rotates around the heating assembly, and the grease required to lubricate the inside of the sleeve must withstand very high temperatures. Some manufacturers, especially of photocopiers, use a constant supply of oil to get round this problem.

The issue is, what grease to use when refurbishing a fuser? Below is a summary.

For older and standard printers, plenty of people are using Chemplex 710, which is silicone based.

If a fuser film sleeve has a metal contact ring at one end, it requires fluorinated polymer grease. “The metal base sleeves are built for newer models of printer, such as HP LaserJet P4014, HP LaserJet Enterprise M601, HP LaserJet 4250, HP LaserJet 4300, and most color printers such as HP Color LaserJet 4700, HP Color LaserJet CP2025, HP Color LaserJet CP3525 etc.”

“My supplier told me that Canon/HP uses the Uniflor grease on their fusers at the factory. They claim they contacted HP with a fake grease in the eye claim and asked for the MSDS which pointed at Uniflor as the supplier. The grease won’t stay liquid as the heat will solidify it. If you ever took apart an OEM fuser that had 200,000 copies on it, you’d see that grease had solidified as well. We haven’t experienced the failures you’re having. Maybe some of the other forum techs will voice their opinion. - moe”

www.partsmart-corp.com/blog/how-choose-right-grease-fuser-film-sleeve-fusing-film-sleeve
www.fixyourownprinter.com/posts/61845

So we have:




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